Prime Numbers – Radio 4 In Our Time

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss prime numbers: 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17 …

‘This sequence of numbers goes on literally forever…For nearly two and a half thousand years, since Euclid first described the prime numbers in his book Elements, mathematicians have struggled to write a rule to predict what comes next in the sequence. The Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler feared that it is “a mystery into which the human mind will never penetrate.” But others have been more hopeful…’

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martin56jones

"The mathematician's patterns, like the painter's or the poet's, must be beautiful; the ideas, like the colours or the words, must fit together in a harmonious way. " G H Hardy, A Mathematician's Apology (London 1941).

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