Does Science Rob Nature of its Mystery and Beauty? – Professor Alister McGrath

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“The puzzle of time” from plus magazine

The puzzle of time

from plus magazine by Marianne Freiberger

“One thing that’s painfully clear to all of us is that time has a direction. It marches onwards with horrifying regularity and there is no way of turning it back. From a physical viewpoint, this direction of time presents a puzzle, because it’s not there in the fundamental laws of physics. Resolving this riddle is a task, not just for physicists, but also for philosophers. In May 2012 we went along to a conference on the philosophy of cosmology in Oxford, to witness representatives of both creeds grapple with time. We spoke to the eminent Roger Penrose, and the no less illustrious philosophers of physics Jeremy Butterfield and David Wallace. You can listen to the interviews in our podcast, but if you prefer your words on a page, keep reading.”

Extra Time: Professor Sir Roger Penrose in conversation with Andrew Hodges.’

Extra Time: Professor Sir Roger Penrose in conversation with Andrew Hodges.’

Roger Penrose

“These two films explore the development of Sir Roger Penrose’s thought over more than 60 years, ending with his most recent theories and predictions.”

The Mathematical Institute, Oxford University.

The State of Being Stuck

Fascinating interview – so important to recognise the nature of doing mathematics.

Math with Bad Drawings

Last year, I got the high school math teacher’s version of a wish on a magic lamp: a chance to ask a question of the world’s most famous mathematician.

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Andrew Wiles gained his fame by solving a nearly 400-year-old problem: Fermat’s Last Theorem. The same puzzle had captivated Wiles as a child and inspired him to pursue mathematics. His solution touched off a mathematical craze in a culture where “mathematical craze” is an oxymoron. Wiles found himself the subject of books, radio programs, TV documentaries—the biggest mathematical celebrity of the last half-century.

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